Family saves cat with serious injury—then vet takes X-ray of her skull and makes horrifying discovery

It’s said that cats have nine lives. And they do seem to have an uncanny ability to survive—even when they’re subjected to the most terrible abuse.

Miss Kiss is a tabby cat that was abandoned and left to die from her injuries in Spanish Fork, Utah. Luckily for her, a family was walking along the Spanish Fork River Trail when they found her stuck in a thorny rosebush, and they picked her up and walked 2 miles to their car.

No one, however, was prepared for what the vet would find.

“We could immediately tell she was in distress, we took some X-rays which showed a large steel blow dart through her head,” said Dr. Isaac Bott, veterinarian from Mountain West Animal Hospital

The little cat had a 4-inch (10-cm) blow dart in her brain. Somehow, she survived, but no one knows how long the dart had been lodged there.

While the dart in her head had miraculously spared her life, Miss Kiss must have been in a lot of pain.

“We realized we needed to do some brain surgery—that was probably the most difficult surgery I’ve performed as a veterinarian,” Bott told Caters News Agency. “If the dart through her brain wasn’t enough, there was a second dart embedded into her front shoulder—that dart tip had broken off.”

Miss Kiss survived, however, she lost the sight of her right eye because the dart hit the back of her optic nerve. But it doesn’t seem to bother her one bit.

Fittingly, she was adopted by a man named Kevin, who is also blind in one eye. Kevin uses ping pong balls to help Miss Kiss with her “paw-eye” coordination. He even sleeps on the floor with Miss Kiss to make her feel safe in her new home.

Considering the trauma Miss Kiss went through, the fact she is still able to be near humans is amazing. And it would seem, fortunately, Miss Kiss’s faith in humanity has not been misplaced, as her new owner knows what matters in life—caring for one another—and how to treasure that relationship!

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